Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art

In Abortive Art, Deanna ponders a potential art piece by Julian Murphy. There are plenty of mixed emotions involved in that work, but there’s one thing I noticed about Murphy’s “Tantric Pop Art” in general…

vacuum julian murphy

murphy lesbians table

And that is how Murphy’s works are quite reminiscent and even derivative of works by Allen Jones.

IMG_6502

allen jones erotic female furniture sculpturesIn comparison, Murphy’s works are both derivative and deminutive. Where Jones has furniture and large sculpture, Murphy has not only smaller objects like vacuums and clamps but most of his works are mere illustrative renderings of concepts. In that sense, one feels more comfortable comparing Murphy’s graphic work to that of Patrick Nagel.

patrick nagelObviously, Nagel’s women, even when bent-over in take-me positions, are superior and in control ~ while Murphy’s, like Jones’, are nearly the opposite. But there are stylistic similarities between the two as well.

Like Nagel, Murphy has a very simplified style descended from the geometry of Art Deco design. But where Nagel’s nearly-flattened fantasy women are composed with a cool distance (a haughtiness which seems to emanate from the female subject herself), Murphy’s pieces are even colder. Even when they feature males.

Img3032_Calling-the-Tune

Murphy’s works go beyond any fantasy notions of an ideal or idealized woman into fantasy ideals of modern mass production. His graphic works are more like blueprints for mechanical pieces which are to tumble off an assembly line. In these products, it’s no longer about the sexual objectification but instead is about the objects themselves which proffer human anatomy as some sort of “familiarity” in design. The result is a body of work so divorced from humanity that it does not really deserve the distinction of being credited as “exploring objectification” or even, by my personal definition, earn the label of “erotic”.

Jones, on the other hand, has many works which beg the discussion of erotic objectification. For example (below), in Pop in Effigy (Vogue, January 1970) Allen’s wife Janet Brown kneels in the an Eames 670 chair along with the fabricated female forniphilia.

 Pop-in-Effigy-allen-jones-janet-brown-1970Because Jones plays with actual female forms, however fantasized or idealized, and pushes the concepts into conceptual works which literally and figuratively objectify human beings, Jones and his works push buttons ~ both erotic and intellectual buttons. And so even when Jones makes a woman a refrigerator, there’s nothing cold about it. A heated response is mandatory. (Or as nearly so as any work can be.)

IMG_6505Murphy and his works, on the other hand, do not compel me. No buttons, neither erotic nor intellectual, are pushed for me because the concepts or ideas seem unfinished, un-felt ~ like a lazy person laying about with a fleeting idea they never invest in enough to see through.

Jones, however, sees things through, forcing you to come to your own conclusions about sexual objectification, fetishism, eroticism… You can see more of Jones’ works here.

allen jones vintage

7 thoughts on “Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art

  1. Pingback: Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art | Sex~Kitten.net | Sex Writer | Scoop.it

  2. Pingback: Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art | Sex~Kitten.net | Sex History | Scoop.it

  3. Pingback: Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art | Sex~Kitten.net | Let's Get Sex Positive | Scoop.it

  4. Pingback: The Sex History I’ve Been Reading – Silent Porn Star

  5. Pingback: Exploring Erotic Objectification In Art | Sex~K...

  6. Pingback: Decorative Girls

  7. Pingback: A Fresh Hot Slice | Sex~Kitten.net

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>